Introduction

More and more people are being diagnosed with Mental Health conditions each and every year. According to the Center for Disease Control & Prevention, about 1 out of 5 adults (ages 18+) reports some kind of mental illness each year1. There are over 200 types of mental illnesses. The American Psychiatric Association provides a full list of these illness here.

The most common mental illnesses2 are:

  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Disruptive Behavior Disorders
  • Depression & Other Mood Disorders
  • Eating Disorders
  • Personality Disorders
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Schizophrenia Spectrum & Other Psychotic Disorders
  • Substance Use Disorders

You are not alone

If you have experienced or are currently experiencing any of the following symptoms, it is important to recognize that you may have a mental health condition, and you should see your primary care provider or mental health professional. Mental illness can get worse over time, so it is important not to wait. It is also important to understand that you are not alone. Mental illnesses are quite common and most are fully treatable.

According to the Mayo Clinic, the following symptoms may be signs of a mental health condition3:

  • Feeling sad or down
  • Confused thinking or reduced ability to concentrate
  • Excessive fears or worries, or extreme feelings of guilt
  • Extreme mood changes of highs and lows
  • Withdrawal from friends and activities
  • Significant tiredness, low energy or problems sleeping
  • Detachment from reality (delusions), paranoia or hallucinations
  • Inability to cope with daily problems or stress
  • Trouble understanding and relating to situations and to people
  • Problems with alcohol or drug use
  • Major changes in eating habits 
  • Sex drive changes
  • Excessive anger, hostility or violence
  • Suicidal thinking

Ask for help if you need it

There is no shame in asking for help. If you think or feel like you need help, ASK! Here are some organizations that provide resources you can reach out to directly if you or a loved one is need of support.

Mental Health Resources

The following are intended to give you quick access to mental health information and resources.

NIH provides a list of resources to support you in finding help for you, a friend, or family members. Resources include getting help in a crisis, finding a healthcare provider or treatment, and others.
The American Psychiatric Association has an easy-to-use lookup tool to help you find psychiatrists in your area. Click below to access the lookup tool.

NAMI has a robust list, including: helplines, suicide & crisis hotlines, financial assistance, advocacy & legal, and community support.